23
Mar

Amniotic fluid is the nourishing liquid contained by the amnion of a pregnant woman.

The amnion grows and begins to fill, mainly with water, around two weeks after fertilisation. After a further 10 weeks the liquid contains proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and phospholipids, urea and electrolytes, all which aid in the growth of the fetus. In the late stages of gestation much of the amniotic fluid consists of fetal urine.


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Baby's urine …

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baby's urine

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I read that is the same consistancy as the ocean.

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mostly water

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Stella

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it is majority of baby urine

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Babys urine, maybe some fine hair off the baby in the later weeks, as it helps baby have its first bowel movement after the birth.

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In the second trimester the fluid isn't much different from the baby's plasma, indicating an origin from secretions through the umbilical cord, membrane coverings of the placenta, and even the baby's skin. By the 36th week there is usually around a liter of amniotic fluid, but by this time it is made up for the most part from fetal urine.

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baby's urine,cells,etc.

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The watery fluid within the amnion that surrounds the fetus. Amniotic fluid cushions the fetus from injury, allows movement, and helps to stabilize temperature. The composition of the fluid changes over the course of gestation. Initially, amniotic fluid is similar to maternal plasma. As the fetus develops, phospholipids originating from the lungs, fetal cells, lanugo, and urine are deposited in the fluid.

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Where does amniotic fluid come from?

Early in the pregnancy, the placenta produces amniotic fluid. Later on, about the fourth month or so, the baby's kidneys start to work, and then the amniotic fluid is made there. Although the kidneys ultimately are responsible for filtering waste products out of the blood and making urine, amniotic fluid is not urine as we think of it. The majority of the baby's waste products actually are transported through the placenta to the mother's circulation and are then filtered by her kidneys. This cycle repeats on a regular basis as the baby swallows fluid and releases it through her urinary system, and so on.


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in early pregnancy, it contains mainly water, then in about 10 weeks, it contains proteins, carbohydrates, and some other stuff, and near the end it contains urine.

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Early on the amniotic fluid is made up of electrolytes, later it is mostly urine after the baby starts to urinate. Sounds gross, but the baby is only swallowing amniotic fluid so it is just recycling, really.

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mostly baby pee

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Dr Pepper and semen.

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As any baby could tell you (if they could talk), amniotic fluid is the clear, yellowish liquid that surrounds the unborn baby. It is contained in the amniotic sac. The fluid consists mostly of fetal urine that bathes the developing fetus. The fetus floats in this fluid, which is warmed to the mother’s body temperature.

The amniotic fluid increases in volume as the fetus grows. The amount of amniotic fluid is greatest at about 34 weeks after conception or 34 weeks ga (gestational age). At 34 weeks ga, the amount of amniotic fluid is about 800 ml. This amount reduces to about 600 ml at 40 weeks ga when the baby is born.

Amniotic fluid is continually being swallowed and "inhaled" and replaced through being "exhaled", as well as being urinated by the baby. Not terribly tasteful to us in more ways than one. But the developing baby doesn't mind at all. It is essential that the amniotic fluid be breathed into the lungs by the fetus in order for the lungs to develop normally.

Analysis of amniotic fluid, drawn out of the mother's abdomen in an amniocentesis procedure, can reveal many aspects of the baby's genetic health. This is because the fluid also contains fetal cells which can be examined for genetic defects.

Amniotic fluid also protects the developing baby by cushioning against blows to the mother's abdomen, allows for easier fetal movement, promotes muscular/skeletal development, and helps protect the fetus from heat loss.

This entry was posted on Sunday, March 23rd, 2008 at 3:42 am and is filed under Pregnancy. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or TrackBack URI from your own site.

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